Troop 224 Blog

Troop 224 Girls Patrol Orienteering in San Francisco

Our Goats scampered for 8 miles this weekend learning Orienteering skills at Bay Area Orienteering at the Presidio Saturday Feb 16th.

Patrol Leader Kyra Ariker led our Goats Zoe, Catherine, Carolyn, Hazel, Caitlin through three orienteering courses for beginners, intermediates and then the Chase!

Troop 224 Girls Patrol

We left Lafayette Bart early Sat morning,  has a warm up hike  and the attended the getting started basics course .

Fantastic help from parents Mrs. Ariker and Mr. Braunstein. Couldn’t do it without parents leaning in to help their girls!

Orienteering Map

Orienteering Map

Check out our course and our team pics!

YIS

Mr. Ariker

SCM

 

Ready….Set…..Go!

Troop 224G started with a Big Bang Feb 1, 2019 with 8 registered girls, a dedicated Scout Master and multiple female leaders. 

Our girls are amazing and we are so proud of them. A strong Scout welcome to: Kyra Ariker, Zoe Braunstein, Catherine Bronte, Carolyn Bronte, Caitlin Crinnion, Maddie David, Dakota Goyert, Ashlyn Weber. They have received limited edition special BSA Council patches for being among the first girls to join BSA!

Troop 224G

Our Scout Guides from Troop 224 were there on hand to teach, lead and guide. Thanks to Drew Lashinsky and Drew Campio.

troop 224 G

The girls got a head start learning camping basics, the 10 essentials, and preparing to be a Scout with our Flight to First Class program. They have chosen a great Patrol name….the Goat Patrol, hard to catch, climbs anything, independent….well you get the idea! 

The 8 girls elected Kyra Ariker as their patrol leader, Ashlyn Weber as the Assistant Patrol Leader and Katie Bronte as the Scribe.

They have planned some great activities with Troop 224 as well as some special activities they have chosen.

Please come join us! We would love to have you.
 

Tamarancho Mountain Biking

Since it was my second time doing the Tamarancho bike and rifle shooting trip, I thought I knew what to expect, a bike trip that's pretty hard and is gonna hurt, but my expectations were blown out of the water when I found out what was really in store. We arrived at the camp, ate lunch, set up our tents, then finally started our bike ride. We were surprised to see that the terrain was muddy, rocky, and sketchy to ride on.

224 Riders

At one point there was a dip the exact size of half a bike tire you had to go through. We climbed a winding slope until we hit the intersection which led on to Serpentine trail. Serpentine was very scary, and full of steep rocky slopes, and large bumps. Most scouts walked this part but I found it very fun to ride. After around an hour, we started a route called the Flow trail, which was a pump track with lots of banked switchbacks. You could go REALLY fast down the flow trail. After a long journey, we arrived back at camp. We had some downtime, ate dinner, had a campfire and went to bed.

224 Riders

The next morning we got up and were ready to head to the shooting range at 9. We should have started packing earlier because there wasn't enough time for breakfast. The range staff  went through the rifle shooting safety, then we were ready to shoot. As some of us waited for our turns to shoot, we went on a quick hike down to the lake. We saw newts, and some other cool wild life. We got back just in time to shoot. We then shot and cleaned the 22 caliber rifles and closed the weekend with roses and thorns. Finally, we went home after a long, exciting trip -worn out and sore, but happy.

Notes from the UL about this trip:

    1. The event is not for beginning or novice riders. Tamarancho Trail is rated 8 out of 10 in technical skills needed. Extremely rocky terrain, dress accordingly;
    2. Ben’s Duty Board helped keep everyone accountable to their assigned tasks;
    3. Repair kit, extra inner tube and first aid kit are mandatory for all participants—no exceptions.
    4. Shooting range limited to 8, bring tomahawks or football to occupy time while waiting;
    5. Medical Forms A-B & C required for mountain bike trail participants;
    6. In event of rain, Marin Mountain Biking Museum is located down the hill in Fairfax.

Tomales Bay Writeup

Seeing the bioluminescence during the night paddle was a very unique experience, especially seeing schools of fish make light trails in the water as we paddled at night. The darker the better for seeing the bio (e.g., no moon).

Many of the Scouts, especially the younger ones, got tired of paddling. We launched from Millers Boat Launch (aka Nick’s Cove), at about 11:00 we paddled west across the bay north of hog island, and southeast to Tomales Beach where there were restrooms, trash, and tables. We got there about 2:30. There was plenty of room for more campers on the beach. We had a roaring campfire, but no skits, because the group was tired and cold after the night paddle.

We returned in a more direct route on Sunday morning. We saw seals, pelicans, sea gulls, jelly fish, clams, and many other birds. At night, our food was attacked by raccoons and we heard coyotes. Some of the Scouts didn’t bring enough clothes. Once clothes got wet they wouldn’t dry due to damp, windy, and cool weather. Sand from the beach got into everything.

The gear boat was critical to transport the equipment. The Blue Water Kayaking guides were very knowledgeable, but seemed to lack experience with Boy Scouts. They provided wet suits and splash jackets, although they weren’t really necessary. They provided tables, chairs, drinking water, and other kitchen equipment. 

It was a great trip! 

Advance Camp 2018

About 21 scouts from Troop 224 went to Advance Camp at the Solano County Fairgrounds this year.  It was a great experience for everyone who attended.  Colin was the scout leader of the trip and Mr. Kryzuliack was the aduly organizer, thanks to both of them for the work you put in for the Troop. 

Many merrit badges and rank advancements happened.  There were over 2500 scouts in attendance.  

 

scouts troop 224 lafayette logo